Ethan's Age

I Want to Read...

Here is a list of books I'd like to read.
(Along with a brief description, usually one I find on the library or Amazon website.)
Once I read them, I will post a review with the Tag "Book Review" in the blog proper. (And if I feel especially ambitious, link the review right here on this page.  Wouldn't that be awesome of me?)

  • Cinderella Ate My Daughter- The acclaimed author of the groundbreaking bestseller Schoolgirls reveals the dark side of pink and pretty: the rise of the girlie-girl, she warns, is not that innocent. Status: Read.  2 out of 5 stars- basically I found this book to be repetitive after the first few chapters.  Basic synopsis: Media is a bad influence on girls.  
  • Love and Logic- Take the exhaustion out and put the fun into parenting your little one.If you want help with: Potty training Temper tantrums Bedtime Whining Time-out Hassle-free mornings and many other everyday challenges, Then this book is for you.
  • Happiest Kid on the Block- Karp, a pediatrician in Santa Monica, Calif., and assistant professor at the School of Medicine, UCLA, offers a new method to calm and soothe crying infants. While nursing or being held satisfies some babies, others seemingly cry for hours for no reason. These babies suffer from what Karp calls the Fourth Trimester. When you bring your soft, dimpled newborn home from the hospital, you may think your nursery is a peaceful sanctuary.... To him, it's a disorienting world part Las Vegas casino, part dark closet! Karp recommends a series of five steps designed to imitate the uterus.
  • Nurture Shock: New Thinking About Children- Parents and guardians--just get ye to a bookstore and read the first chapter. I think you will be galvanized by its immediacy and logic (as well as back-up data) and it will inspire you to continue. It all clicked when I read about our praise-junkie tendencies, and how it has a paradoxical effect. The authors never condescend to us; they maintain that all of us want to make the best and most informed decisions.
  • What's Going There?- BThough not for the impatient, What's Going on in There? How the Brain and Mind Develop in the First Five Years of Life will undoubtedly make you a better parent. It is thick, detailed, and scientific. But it is also accessible to parents who have the time and patience to immerse themselves in the latest research on brain development.
  • Positive Discipline - You'll find practical solutions and solid advice on how to: Encourage independence and exploration while providing appropriate boundaries, Use non-punitive methods to instill valuable social skills and positive behavior inside and outside the home, Recognize when your child is ready to master the challenges of sleeping, eating, and potty training, and how to avoid the power struggles that often come with those lessons, Identify your child's temperament, Understand what the latest research in brain development tells us about raising healthy children
  • Playful Parenting- Tag, you're it! In Playful Parenting, Lawrence Cohen demonstrates that parents need to lighten up and spend a few hours giggling with their kids. Play is inherently educational for children, he claims, and parents can learn plenty by examining the games kids play--from peekaboo to practical jokes.
  • 1-2-3 Magic- This revised edition of the award-winning 1-2-3 Magic program addresses the difficult task of child discipline with humor, keen insight, and proven experience. The technique offers a foolproof method of disciplining children ages two through 12 without arguing, yelling, or spanking.
  • 5 Love Languages of Children - Does your child speak a different language? Sometimes they wager for your attention, and other times they ignore you completely. Sometimes they are filled with gratitude and affection, and other times they seem totally indifferent. Attitude. Behavior. Development. Everything depends on the love relationship between you and your child. When children feel loved, they do their best. 
  • The Baby Book- The Baby Book, attachment parenting specialists William Sears and Martha Sears have provided new parents with their approach to every aspect of baby care basics, from newborns to toddlers. Attachment parenting is a gentle, reasonable approach to parenting that stresses bonding with your baby, responding to her cues, breastfeeding, "wearing" your baby, and sharing sleep with your child. For those parents who worry about negative effects of this attention, the Sears say, "Spoiling is what happens when you leave something (or some person) alone on the shelf--it spoils." Status: Read.  I want to buy this book.  It is SO chock full of information I don't want to return it to the library!
  • Einstein Never Used Flashcards- Authors and child psychologists Hirsh-Pasek, Golinkoff and Eyer join together to prove that training preschoolers with flash cards and attempting to hurry intellectual development doesn't pay off. In fact, the authors claim, kids who are pressured early on to join the academic rat race don't fair any better than children who are allowed to take their time. Alarmed by the current trend toward creating baby Einsteins, Hirsh-Pasek and Golinkoff urge parents to step back and practice the "Three R's: Reflect, Resist, and Recenter." Instead of pushing preschoolers into academically oriented programs that focus on early achievement, they suggest that children learn best through simple playtime, which enhances problem solving skills, attention span, social development and creativity.
  • Nurtureshock- The central premise of this book by Bronson (What Should I Do with My Life?) and Merryman, a Washington Post journalist, is that many of modern society's most popular strategies for raising children are in fact backfiring because key points in the science of child development and behavior have been overlooked.
  • Motherhood in the Age of Madness - Warner's book seeks to answer the question, "Why are today's young mothers so stressed out?" Whether shuttling kids to "enriching" after-school activities or worrying about the quality of available child care, the women of Perfect Madness describe a life far out of balance.
  • "The Vaccine Book" Sears, coauthor of several books in the Sears Parenting series, addresses one of today's most controversial and worrisome questions. Sears' goal is "to give you a balanced look at pros and cons of vaccination so that you can make an educated decision." Sears does not advocate for or rail against vaccination, stating it doesn't have to be an all or nothing decision-there are choices. Status: Read!  I felt like the information was provided in a straight forward, unbiased manner.  I didn't change what my thoughts were towards vaccines, but I was able to make a better informed choice.
  • Punished by Rewards- Although aimed at a general audience, the book is based on extensive research and documented with almost 100 pages of notes and references. The first six review the behaviorist tradition and lay out in a clear and convincing manner Kohn's central argument that "pop behaviorism" is dangerously prevalent in our society. Here Kohn discusses why rewards, including praise, fail to promote lasting behavior change or enhance performance and frequently make things worse.
  • The Baby Instruction Manual- At Last! A Beginner’s Guide to Newborn Baby Technology
    You’ve programmed your VCR, you’ve reinstalled Microsoft Windows, you can even check your e-mail on your Palm Pilot. But none of this experience will prepare you for the world’s biggest technological marvel: a newborn baby.  Through step-by-step instructions and helpful schematic diagrams, The Baby Owner’s Manual explores hundreds of frequently asked questions: What’s the best way to swaddle a baby? How can I make my newborn sleep through the night? When should I bring the baby to a doctor for servicing? Whatever your concerns, you’ll find the answers here—courtesy of celebrated pediatrician Dr. Louis Borgenicht and his son, Joe Borgenicht. Together, they provide plenty of useful advice for anyone who wants to learn the basics of childcare. Status: Read.  This was a tongue in cheek direction manual.  No actual practical information, persay, but a good giggle.